Jul. 11th, 2016

jakebe: (Mythology)
One of the earliest memories I have about my mental illness is breaking down in the middle of lunch in sixth or seventh grade. Things were not going well for me. I was a shy and awkward kid who loved reading fantasy books. I was really sensitive, so I didn't hold up to bullying very well. And I had gotten into trouble enough that in addition to homework and everything else, I had to write a sentence "I will not...something something something." 1000 times.

I was sitting alone, trying to think of what impossible task I should do over lunch and how I could justify putting off the others, when I just needed to put my head down. It didn't help. Tears welled up and I let them fall. My entire body locked up. All I wanted to do was curl up tighter. Someone found me, stood me up, and asked me if I had eaten anything. Then they marched me up to the lunch line.

It felt like my entire body had fallen asleep. I didn't have full control over the way I moved, so I just lurched around like Frankenstein's monster. I couldn't stop crying. There was no way I could eat, or speak, or open my mouth. When the lunch lady asked if I needed anything, all I could do was sob and shake my head and lurch back to my seat.

To this day I have no idea what to call that episode. A panic attack? A nervous breakdown? Who knows. But it happened again when my sister ran away from home, and again shortly after I dropped out of college and moved to Arkansas.

I've been dealing with depression and anxiety for my entire life. Most of the memories I have of my childhood are unhappy ones, where something in my brain just snapped and a response rose from within me that I still don't understand. What's more, I can remember similar things happening to the people around me; my father's mind going after his divorce, retreating further into himself; my mother disappearing for hours to sleep off depression; my sister's mood swings; the strange rumors that dogged certain neighbors. When I was growing up, our understanding of mental illness was little more than being able to identify "crazy" behavior; if someone did something "crazy" once too often, then they were branded. And there wasn't anything they could do to shake that off.

Even now, knowing what I know about my family history and the struggles that my siblings and I face, I see that for the most part that understanding hasn't deepened much. My sister is on medication that makes her incoherent or sleepy. My brothers still do things they don't understand. And, now that she's reaching the end of her life, my mother is beginning to forget things and become confused.

It's taken me a long time to come to grips with my mental illness, to accept it and learn how to incorporate it into my self-image. But there are so many black Americans and others in the diaspora who either can't or won't for a constellation of reasons. Most of us simply can't afford treatment for mental health issues, and wouldn't know where to begin even if we could. There is a stigma, even now, around therapy and medication that makes it difficult to encourage folks to seek out. There is still this narrative that those of us with mental illnesses are just "weak" or "whining" and only need to "get your mind right" to overcome them. We know so little, but we have such strong opinions.

Talking about my personal struggle with these things is still frightening to me, even though I do it so much. But it's important that I do. Within black circles, and geek circles, and even Buddhist circles, there is so much misinformation about mental illness and what people who deal with them are like. If being open about them can help to dispel that, then that's what I have to do. For my family, for my friends, and for my community.

If you are dealing with a mental health issue, please know that you're not alone. There are more of us than you know, willing and able to lend a hand. If at all possible, do what you can to lessen the stigma around these issues -- especially in minority groups. There is no shame at all in having a chronic mental illness, or in seeking treatment for it. There is no shame in doing what you need to do in order to be the best person you can.

November 2016

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