Mar. 28th, 2016

jakebe: (Reading)
Sam Wilson has not had an easy time of it during his short stint with the shield. He's basically operating on a shoestring budget out of the basement of a neighborhood church, with only two (testy) people on his staff and no resources. He's on the "wrong" side of an ideological difference with his best friend and former mentor, Steve Rogers; that same difference has caused most of the public to turn against him. And, for four issues, he was transformed into a wolf/human hybrid against his will by a mad doctor.
Fortunately for us, Sam's trouble is our delight. The first six issues of Sam Wilson: Captain America makes a bold statement about how he handles the responsibility of being a symbol; writer Nick Spencer positions Wilson as a superhero in an intensely divided country, so no matter what he does he's going to piss off half the population. Still, Wilson takes a stand even though it's unpopular, because he's learned the only lesson worth knowing from Rogers. In order to be worthy of the costume, you have to live up to your morals unflinchingly.
What makes Sam so interesting as Cap is that his morality is so different from Steve's. Their big rift comes from the fallout of learning that SHIELD has been working on a Cosmic Cube that has the power to reshape reality. The person who leaked this information, an Edward Snowden-type known only as The Whisperer, was nearly caught until Sam helped him -- he believed that blowing the whistle on SHIELD's activities is a public service that he shouldn't be punished for. Rogers, on the other hand, thinks that though The Whisperer did the right thing, he should still be brought to trial for his actions. Wilson doesn't believe it's possible to trust due process in this case, but Rogers does. It's the difference between Lawful Good and Neutral Good.
That rift deepens when Wilson takes on a militia appointing themselves as border patrol to stop the flow of illegal immigrants, and it's there he discovers people are being taken and experimented on by Dr. Malus. On the run from SHIELD and Rogers, Wilson is captured and turned into Cap-Wolf, which is the real reason you folks should get these issues. Of course.
Wilson's investigation takes him through the business world, where Serpent Solutions is making a power-play on behalf of other corporations. The commentary on the current state of corporate politics is a little more ham-fisted, but Sam's resolution of the arc is surprising yet pragmatic; what I love about the way the story winds down is his realization that ideals don't happen in a vacuum. Choices have far-reaching consequences, because at this point of American life everything is connected. You can't advance your morality without stepping on a political landmine, and those politics are deeply influenced by gigantic corporate interests whose success and failure affect the livelihood of millions. If you shut down one thing, you begin a cascade that quickly spirals outside of your control.
Steve Rogers and Sam Wilson have different ways of reacting to the system. Rogers' Captain America was wholly inspirational; he wanted to be the physical embodiment of the best principles America was founded upon. He believes that the system works, but only as long as the people within it strive for the ideals they serve to the best of their ability. Wilson's Captain America isn't so sure; he believes that the system is rigged and leaves out a lot of people who can't defend themselves against it, and those are the people he wishes to serve.
The Whisperer is the embodiment of that difference in opinion. Since Steve believes in the system, he believes that he can convince people to do the right thing and justice will prevail. But Wilson understands that even if they win in the courtroom, other connected threads will act to preserve the status quo however it can. The system will protect its own, and Steve is inextricably tied to it. Sam has always been an outsider, so his morality doesn't depend on that allegiance.
So who IS Captain America these days? What interest does he serve? As our understanding of the government shifts and our ideas about what it should and should not be doing changes, every once in a while we need to step back and check on that. I love that Nick Spencer is really diving into that through Sam's turbulent first days on the job, and I'm really curious how Wilson's journey continues. There is going to be a lot more fighting for him coming up -- Avengers: Standoff is getting into full-swing, and there won't even be time to take a breath before Civil War II lights up comic stores this summer. Somewhere in all of that, Steve Rogers will don the mantle of Captain America once more, giving us two versions of the hero serving two different visions of America.
Maybe, at this point, that's the best we can hope for.

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